Recent Entries:

  • December 7th, 2016

    In a brief essay on Eudora Welty’s collection The Bride of the Innisfallen, Peter Orner asserts that “The Burning” “is the story that comes closest to failure, and so the writer loves it all the more.” When a writer wades into the making with unknowingness, the outcome is in doubt. A residue of obliviousness remains in the finished work making it all the more beloved.

  • November 28th, 2016

    Supplication: Selected Poems of John Wieners (Wave Books) and Stars Seen in Person: Selected Journals by John Wieners (City Lights Books)
    My Blue Piano, poems by Else Lasker-Schüler, translated from the German by Brooks Haxton (Syracuse University Press)

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

  • November 16th, 2016

    Welcome back to The Seawall’s semi-annual poetry feature. This season, nine poets write briefly on some of their favorite recently published titles. This multi-poet/title feature is posted here in April and November. Scroll down to read. The commentary includes:

  • November 9th, 2016

    Poetry is sparking with the urgency to expose the ways in which historical, cultural, physiological, and personal meanings impinge on our use of language.

  • November 1st, 2016

    There are at least two audiences for the new autobiographies by Brian Wilson and Mike Love. The first comprises Boomers who still buy tickets to hear the aged Beach Boys sing “California Girls” and want to linger over their idols. The second group ruminates over the Beach Boys’ significance and puzzling discography.

  • October 23rd, 2016

    We are archaic -- in our sources, impulses, outreaches and aloneness. They say dogs have stereo olfaction -- they can smell two things at once through independent nostrils. Some poets have dual sensors, too – one for the triggering situation, one for the archaic presence within it.